Used To Describe Everything From Slippers To Sushi, Has The Term “Self-Care” Completely Jumped The Shark?

In this edition of Beauty Independent’s ongoing series posing questions to beauty entrepreneurs, we ask brand 16 founders and executives: Has the term “self-care” been overused to the point of meaninglessness?

Bee Simonds Founder, H Is For Love

I don't really think it has. There are times when, since becoming immersed in the world of truly clean beauty, I feel certain terms may be tired, but then I speak to someone a little outside of this sphere, and I'm reminded of just how far there is to go.

Self-care is a movement that includes scouring ingredient decks with a discerning eye, choosing the very best for ourselves, and lavishing our bodies with products that do their jobs naturally. It's a movement that continues to be needed by the masses. We're not just playing to the people already on the green team. I view it as our mission to go out and rescue those who haven't yet heard the good news. Self-care is and will remain the future.

Erika Wasser Founder and CEO, Glam+Go

Honestly, some things jump the shark, but are still great. Anything that helps people in this chaotic world to feel OK about taking care of themselves inside and out is a good thing, within reason.

Are the Insta-girls overdoing the self-care thing? Sure. But I hope the incessant charcoal mask selfies are reminding the rest of us to take a long bath or read a book for pleasure on a nice afternoon because we all deserve a bit of self-care.

Mary Ware Founder, Minimo Skin Essentials

The act of self-care will never go out of style, but the marketing terms we use to describe it will. I do think the term “self-care” is becoming fatigued and, as a brand, we adjust with the market.

We are very much millennials, and our ear is to the wall when it comes to whatever our target demographic is doing and saying. If the term “self-care” goes completely out of style, we will Kanye shrug, say, “Weird flex, but OK,” and move on to whatever is hot at the moment.

Brian Oh CEO and Co-Founder of Venn Skincare

I think the marketing term “self-care” has been on-trend and, rightfully so, because consumers have become more knowledgeable of beauty products and their ingredients and science. This is also reflected in the rise of clean beauty, both in terms of supply and demand, and this is not just a U.S. phenomenon, but a global phenomenon as similar trends can be witnessed in Europe, Asia and other parts of the world.

That said, I think the next catch phrase is “streamlined skincare.” People are busy and, for many people, an extensive, complicated skincare routine is not practical. Streamlining process and introducing efficiency have always been on-trend outside beauty (for example, Uber offers the streamlined process for taxi service) and, now, this is picking up in beauty and skincare.

Annie Tevelin Founder, SkinOwl

Unfortunately, the overuse of the word "self-care" in the beauty industry has led to somewhat of an eye-roll response. It's a shame because self-care is so important to the sanity and well-being of a person, but seeing it constantly broadcasted has debased the value of it in many ways.

I believe people want self-care in their lives, be it a meditative bath or soothing face mask, but I also think people want authenticity and accuracy when it comes to calling it self-care. They want it to be in reach, realistic and possible with their busy schedules. I think, over time, we will come up with new ways to illustrate care of self because it is truly so needed in today's chaotic world.

Beatriz Durango Founder and Managing Director, Novellus Skin Care

The term “self-care” is an inherently good one which means a lot to different people. I don’t believe it should be publicized or overused as a marketing tool because of the good that can be achieved when we reflect on it.

I also believe that self-care isn’t a term that is exclusive to the beauty industry either. Self-care is the moments that we have for ourselves that aren’t selfish, but rather necessary to help relax our minds, focus our bodies and recalibrate.

We should all allocate the time to do something for ourselves, whether it is to relax, participate in physical activity or spend time with loved ones. When I see the word “self-care,” it is just a constant reminder to keep that time assigned to myself.

Jennie Fresa Founder and Owner, Copal Clean Beauty

There is certainly a lot of attention on self-care these days and for good reason. Stress levels are high, and we need to focus on taking care of ourselves. This should not be a trend but rather a way of life.

That said, I think the body positivity movement will take the spotlight very soon. I love the idea of breaking the taboo by talking about topics like menstruation and a little extra care down there.  I plan to add a category to the store for products like the menstrual cup and personal care for our intimate areas.

Amber Fawson Co-Founder, Saalt

Self-care has evolved. It started with connotations of face masks and manicures, but we've seen it grow into being a whole body and whole planet experience. We see the lines between beauty and personal health and planet health being blurred.

Consumers want that triple threat, and why shouldn’t they? They want products that are good for them and the planet and that make them look and feel good. Consumers are impact-aware. There is just a different feeling when you are keeping yourself and the planet well cared for. You are leaving a different legacy.

Maya Crothers Founder, Circcell

We try not to focus too much on whether "self-care" or "anti-aging" or whatever term of the day is relevant or not. We mostly try to create great products and speak about them in an authentic and meaningful way.

If we are constantly adjusting to the new fad or catchphrase someone wrote about that morning, we tend to lose our way.  The focus becomes gaming the message versus living our truth and sharing our philosophy, which is the way we prefer to live.

Lourdes Gaudiano Co-Founder, Luly Gaudiano

With so much information widely available about good and bad things, we are becoming overwhelmed on a daily basis. We have to recycle, be ethical, and we have to be activists, save the animals, plant more trees, raise decent humans, plus buy the groceries, wash the clothes, drive the kids, be a partner, cut the grass, go to the office and everything else with a happy face because we practice our positive thinking affirmations every morning.

And that’s why I believe self-care is a great trend and shouldn’t stop there. We really have to slow down and make sure we take care of ourselves. If we do not function properly, we can’t possibly do anything right. The real change starts within us.

For me, the next trend is that the luxury industry is going to be more sustainable and ethical. People do not associate these two markets and, now, brands are realizing that the consumer is getting more educated, but doesn’t want to give up certain lifestyles in order to support this movement. This trend is here to stay. We are becoming a more compassionate and aware society and that will become standard.

Lynette Lovelace Founder and CEO, Lifetherapy

Being that I have been in the self-care mindset with my brand since it's inception 10 years ago, I find myself jumping up and down screaming, "Yes, this is what I have been trying to tell you all!" Beauty is really a mindset, one that comes from within ourselves with reflection and moments of self-care. We have to connect our power of thought to how we feel and how this affects our life's journey.

I personally don't think the term "self-care" is a trend. We are talking about it more because the world has us all in a state of "Now, can I shut off all the noise?" and not come back from my self-care moment feeling like I missed the "next best opportunity" while taking a mental moment for myself.

Our world is moving very fast right now, technology has invaded our natural tendency to slow down and take a moment to think without being stimulated into what to think by what we are reading or engaged in through all the outlets of information flashing in front of us.

I think it is good to bring self-care to the forefront of our conversations and marketing if it will help us realize that, if we don't take care of our bodies and minds through mental breaks, we will eventually crash in mental exhaustion.

Joan Sutton Founding Partner and CEO, 707 Flora

Self-care is great, but I feel, as with many other trends, marketers are pushing it to the point that it becomes a mundane topic. I don’t know what the next catchphrase will be. However, I do think it will sprout from an indie brand brain, then be exploited by mass marketers. It’s cyclical.

I love the idea of self-care and certainly need to practice it more in my own life. That said, we have to be practical and, in this world we live in, we juggle a lot, and demands and stakes are high.

Sylwia Wiesenberg Founder, Bawdy Beauty and Dope Naturally

Self-care has always been a thing, and a term that applied only to few activities like working out or facials, but self-care to me is much broader. There are things we do for ourselves we don’t need to share with others from workouts to eating right to popping ingestible beauty pills powered by CBD to doing treatments and using a butt mask or vaginal care.

Self-care is basically what you do for you, not for others. It is about you! It is what makes you subconsciously feel comfortable, confident and loving yourself. I self-care daily, and it is a part of my life and I won’t give up, especially butt beauty!

Jasmin El Kordi CEO, Bluelene

The word self-care may have become a word we hear more than we would like to in the beauty and wellness space, but the reality is that self-care is something that is essential to our overall wellbeing.

As an entrepreneur and a yoga teacher, I see the great value the self-care movement has created within the beauty industry and beyond. I believe this movement has built a more aware, authentic, conscious and thoughtful community. At the end of the day, if self-care is a buzzword that carries goodness and positivity, I am all for it.

Jennifer Rose Goldman Founder and CEO, Essential Rose Life

Even though self-care has become somewhat of a trendy and amorphous term, it’s not necessarily a bad thing. On the one hand, it’s unfortunate that such an important practice has become associated with superficial ideals, i.e., seeking kale and bath salts to solve your deeper existential, psychological and emotional needs.

Yet, what a blessing that this concept is pervading the general consciousness. Hopefully, in so doing, people who may in the past have felt intimidated by such a way of being can now embrace it, dip their toes in it, and discover a routine that best suits them.

My only wish is that people understand the importance of cultivating self-awareness in self-care.  What I mean is, self-care truly starts with understanding what you need and how to best provide that for yourself. That’s where you can transcend the trend into a space of genuine healing that can fuel your development. And, knowing what you need requires self-awareness in an authentic, personal, and nonjudgmental sense.

Tracy Brown Co-Founder, Priya Apotheca

We see that self-care is really just a code word for loving and honoring yourself. We don’t think it ever possible to jump the shark on that. We live in a world that increasingly challenges our time and space for quiet and time to go within, but we see this as critical to this busy world. When we do this, we can be better mothers, wives, friends, co-workers.

With so many communication channels and platforms, it may be now be an overused word, but the concept will never go away with us. We like to keep our conversations fresh, so perhaps the term self-care shifts into something even more transparent, which we think is a good thing.

If you have a question you’d like Beauty Independent to ask beauty entrepreneurs, please send it to editor@beautyindependent.com.